Kamersvol – a Unique Craft & Gift Market

Kamersvol – a Unique Craft & Gift Market

This year saw the 9th Kamers vol Geskenke (Rooms full of presents), sponsored by Sarie Magazine, held at Lourensford Wine Estate in Somerset West, with another set for Irene, Pretoria scheduled for 29 November-3 December 2011.

This was also my very first Kamersvol! Would you believe it?

The project is run by a group of creative women, who’s aim is to foster the talent of non-mainstream artists and crafters. The goal is that you should be able to find gorgeous gifts and crafts of the sort you can’t easily pick up at retail outlets.

I did spot some retailers selling their wares too, like Rhubarb Room and Honest Chocolate, but I guess their products keep in theme with the type of crafts sold at Kamersvol.

bad weather at kamersvol didn’t keep the crowds away

We had the most unfortunate weather on Saturday – intermittent rain and wind, but this did nothing to deter the crowds. I bumped into an old colleague from my practicing days, and he and his partner gave up the search – no room to move or try things was their feeling.

After a coffee and a black Forest ham and fig croissant from Nook Eatery, we had the sustenance needed to begin the hunt!

My first impression was of a truckload load of pretty! There was enough to make the seeker of 1950’s-style crafts very happy- buttons, baubles, ribbons, thread, even retro straws, soaps, candy.

As you waded through the themed rooms, you came across more – bags, ornaments, wooden toys and boards, bedding, crochet craft, food products, jewellery.

I am never afraid to spend a penny on nice things (you know that, right?), but there were a few over-priced items that probably have an overall negative impact on the entire market and the stall holders trying their best to offer value. I acknowledge, this isn’t a thrift market but two enamel mugs (not antique) for R200 ($20)? 25 retro straws for R50 (available through some baking stores for R38). A painted wooden crate, while very, very pretty, R350. Have these items flown off the shelves? In which case, then good on the sellers for taking the risk.

The stalls at the entrance on the right offered very good value metal cut-out art and wooden boards with proteas and other designs engraved 0n them.

At the far end of the market, a tented food stall sold salads, candy, preserves, chocolates and various warm meals and drinks. Seating was a well thought out feature.

I could not resist some pretty ribbon from Rhubarb room, excellent value for money well-designed earrings from Queen Magpie, toffee bars from Sweet Temptation and soap nuts (!)…wait till I tell Cynthia that we’re going to attempt going all green with the washing.

I also walked out with a bit of inspiration for my own crafting and home-made edible gift packaging ideas. Now, if only I had the patience and half the talent of these artists.

*Tickets cost R45, available through Computicket or at the door. Discounts for students and pensioners*


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By |2017-05-05T17:14:29+00:00November 3rd, 2011|Africa, Markets, Review, Travel, Travel in Africa|2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Fiona - Super Mom November 4, 2011 at 5:07 pm - Reply

    Looks interesting – never been myself but seems worth a venture. I am not really into nik naks – especially over-priced ones! but the ribbons, wooden items look really appealing. I guess something you need to at least try – so I guess I will have to be there next year! thanks for the informative post!:)

  2. Jeanne @ CookSister! November 24, 2011 at 5:39 pm - Reply

    OMG – it’s PROP HEAVEN!! :o)) Good thing I was not there – things might have got messy for the credit card… 😉

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